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Positive Lh Surge Before Period

Sandra asks…

Trying to conceive, confused about when I can test.?

My past two periods were December 16th and January 10th. From what I understand, that would be a 26 day cycle. My cycle is irregular so I know that this is not always so. Anyway, I had been taking ovulation tests and yesterday (Jan 29th) I had an LH surge. This was 20 days after my last period on Jan 10th. If I DO have a 26 day cycle then in six days (from yesterday) I would get my period. At home pregnancy test say you can test up to six days before your missed period. I obviously know I can’t test now because the process of getting pregnant wouldn’t even be done taking place (implantation and all) but when will I be able to?! If my period doesn’t come in a week or so then that’s a good sign but do I need to wait another month before a positive result could show? So lost and frusterated. I hope this is clear enough. Thanks.

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

If your cycle is irregular, then you can’t just look at your last 2 periods to determine how long your cycles are — your LAST cycle was 26 days, but that doesn’t mean you have a 26-day cycle. This cycle may be 35 or 40 days, which would explain why you’re just ovulating now (most women ovulate around 14 days before the start of their next period). If an ovulation kit showed an LH surge yesterday, then you should ovulate today, and then expect your period in about 12-16 days. If it hasn’t come in 16 days, take a pregnancy test.

Lizzie asks…

OPK used as a HPT…?

So I understand that an OPK test strip can detect hCG but a HPT can’t detect Lh. My question is… When u use an OPK it’s recommended 2 test in the afternoon rather than in the morning, but a HPT is the other way around so, should u test with an OPK test strip in the morning or afternoon when trying 2 detect hCG? I had 1 OPK test strip left from this cycle and I didn’t have a HPT so I thought I’d try and c if it would hopefully come up positive. I tested 3 days before my period but at 10 o’clock at nite and it came up with a faint line (but not dark like it is when u get ur Lh Surge) but it was darker than day 1 and 2 of my tests in my fertile time. I’m due 4 my period 2morrow, but i’m not getting my usual cramps that I get b4 my period so i’m hoping maybe I still might have a chance this time around, but I felt really negative when I didn’t c a dark line, should I have tested in the morning or would it b the same result no matter what time… Just curious.

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

And OPK is NOT a HPT!! You can ovulate at any time… Please do a HPT to be sure and GOOD LUCK!

Maria asks…

if im on norethisterone and clomid, when can do a pregnancy test?

i had a positive Ovulation test recently, but i have to take clomid to ovulate, and norethistrone before hand to induce my period. me and the hubby had lots of intercourse around my LH surge, and i know people say to wait 2 to 3 weeks to test but as i wont have a “missed period” to judge it by, i am scared that i might get a negative result, and therefore continue to take my norethisterone to induce the next period, when actually i might have got pregnant but it could be too early to detect. should i put off inducing the period to start my 2nd round untill about 6 weeks after the intercourse, instead of the usual 2 to 3?? just incase i could be pregnant and not realise it?? what does everyone else do who takes norethisterone and clomid??? any help is appreciated!!

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

I HAD TO TAKE NORETHISTERONE 1 3 TIMES A DAY AND THE CLOMID ON THE SECOND DAY OF MY PERIOD WHEN I CAME ON I GAVE IT EXACTLY 3 WEEKS AND DID A TEST AND I WAS PREGGERS LOL HOPE THIS HELPS BUT IT DID WORK FIRST TIME FOR ME AND NOW I AM TRYING THE CYCLE AGAIN I HOPE IT WORKS AGAIN GOOD LOOK LOVE HOPE U GET WHAT U WANT ALL THE BEST XX SOZ FOR THE CAPS LOL

Sharon asks…

How soon can I take a home pregnancy test?

I bought a kit that was designed to track my ovulation, and tell me when my LH surge was, so that I would have a better chance of getting pregnant. After about 10 days, I got a positive result. During the next 48 I had intercourse to try to get pregnant. My LH surge was from the 19-20 of September. I want to know when I can take a home pregnancy test. I know a lot of people say that you can wait about three weeks, and others say “3-5 days before your missed period“. However, my periods are always late, and are not reliable to go on, unfortunately. I am going to buy a test that predicts pregnancy early, like EPT or Clear Blue, but I’m anxious and I don’t want to end up taking the test way too soon. Can someone help me out? Thanks! =]

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

You should wait until you miss your period for the most accurate results. But if you’re that anxious to know, the earliest you should take a test is 10-12 days after you ovulated.

Mary asks…

I have been cramping for the past few days… can someone please help?

My husband and I have been TTC for the past 2 1/2 years without any luck. I started my period Feb. 16. I am not expecting to start again until about the 19th (I have a 30-33 day cycle). We BD the first two days of March before he left for his assignment in California. I ovulate 14 days before my next period. I didn’t chart my BBT this time because I have been sick on and off over the past two weeks and the OPK showed a LH surge on the 4th. The same day of the surge… I had the stretchy CM (which I found a little odd). The next day… I had twinges on mainly my left side (and occasionally on my right). And for the past few days I have been cramping quite a bit on my right side with some extra discharge. Yesterday at work I started to get real bad backaches (which happened in my first pregnancy before I got a positive but it ended in a miscarriage). I am curious as to what is going on. I have already ovulated and it’s too soon for implantation cramps. Anyone experience this before?

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Hi

I am 9 dpo right now and experiencing mild cramps also, even though Af isn’t due til next Wednesday ( another 5 days away). I’ve been ttc for 14 months with one miscarriage 4 months ago. This months does feel very different than usual. I wouldn’t usually have any cramps this early before AF and also have excessive discharge, which is thick and creamy, just so noticeable because of the extreme wetness than usual too, all very strange but sounds like you are experiencing similiar ‘symptoms’ to me right now. Twinges, cramps, discharge etc. It does sound like you tried at all the right times, so I’m hoping it’s a positive for you!!

I’ve just been searching the net and these are all possible pregnancy signs although It’s too early to take a test, which is so frustrating, the waiting part is the worst sometimes. You never know, it could just be wishful thinking but let’s just hope it’s good news hey!! Lots of baby dust to you +++++ Take care

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How Long After Lh Surge Is Detected Does Ovulation Occur

Sandy asks…

sperm lives for how long?

so i hear sperm lives for 3 to 5 days inside a women, does this mean it can only live for 5 days max and 3 days min, like if i have sex today will there still be sperm in me 3 days from now? and how can you make it last longer to increase pregnancy…

I am going to ovulate either tomorrow or the next day apparently (according to calender) so if we have sex tonight i should be good for tomorrow and the next day??

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Sperm Living in Your Body

The maximum is usually five days, and only if you have optimal cervical mucus, which is eggwhite or watery. Sperm last longer in that fluid, which peaks shortly before ovulation. If you have recently menstruated, or are due to again soon, sperm probably won’t last more than a day or two, if they make it past the hostile cervial fluid you have the rest of the month.
Here is more input and advice:

* It is a fact that sperm can live up to 4-5 days in your body, contrary to anything else you may have heard or read. In addition to this fact, the egg released can live between 12-24 hours. Therefore, your fertile period starts approximately 4-5 days PRIOR to ovulation and ends 12-24 hours after ovulation. If you do the math, it is possible for some woman to be fertile for as many as 7 days. You may have heard you can only get pregnant one or two days a month…SO NOT TRUE!!! You may only ovulate that long, but with the life of sperm and the life of the egg, your fertile time can be much longer. Another bit of info that many woman don’t know is that female sperm are slower but stronger and therefore live longer than male sperm which are faster, but weaker. In other words, male sperm will usually beat out female sperm in the race for the egg, yet female sperm will usually out live male sperm. So, if you are trying for a girl, have sex the 5th, 4th, and 3rd day before ovulation and then abstain.

It is not true that there is a difference between the live/speed of sperm depending on whether it’s male or female. ALL sperm are the same basic genetic make-up. The differences lie in what genetic material is carried in the head of the sperm.

* From what I just read, approximately 3-7 days, depending on the acidity of the vagina.

* Depends on when she is ovulating. If there is a lot of mucus (usually a lot more when she IS ovulating), it can last up to 5 days. If not, usually about a day or two.

But sperm can live inside a guy’s body for a month or so after a vasectomy.
Actually it is just 3 days.

Sperm can survive in the female body for 5-10 days, i think. “male” sperm are more fragile than “female” sperm for some reason

Sperm can live in the body for up to 2 weeks

The real answer is what is life?
If it is DNA detectability – 1-2 weeks.
If it is presence of aged but living sperm: maybe 3 days
If it is the young and sprightly sperm that you need for fertilizing the egg – 2 days is hitting the ceiling

There is actually a furious discussion on this topic between short-lifers and long-lifers. The usual answer from short lifers is 24-48h, from long lifers somewhere between 3-7 days.

Why the difference? Mostly, it has to do with how ovulation is detected. Traditionally, ovulations were detected by changes in cervical mucus, basal temperature and Mittelschmerz (midcycle pain), or even by dead reckoning, but all have associated problems, particularly dead reckoning. Cervical mucus changes can precede ovulation by 3-4 days, basal temperature is frequently a fickle indicator, and Midcycle pain occurs regularly just in 10-20% of ovulating women. Even when it occurs, it is frequently associated with the LH surge, and can be used like a biological LH stick. And that dead reckoning (subtracting 14 days from the next due date) is inexact, is easy to understand.

What all these create is a haze with respect to the actual time point of ovulation. And because of this haze, successful inseminations that are almost completely on time can appear as several days off. But that can simply be a false impression.

Detecting impending ovulation with LH surge is much more precise, and it is the procedure normally used by the clinics for IUI. Under those conditions, the clinics never try to trust the viability of sperm over several days. Instead, the standard procedure is to do IUI on the 2nd LH+ day, or 24 hours after inducing ovulation with the LH analogue betaHCG. My own experience as AI donor has been that there is very good fertility on the 2nd LH+ day. 1st day is OK too, but not as high. But inseminations done before the onset of the LH surge were all singularly unsuccessful.

Donna asks…

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome?

Ok, long story short, I’m pretty sure I have polycystic ovary syndrome. All the symptoms are there. Now I just need to set up a doctor’s appointment and start dealing with it. :/

Anyone have any idea as to what kind of treatment I can expect? How long before I start seeing results? I checked WebMD, but it was very vague.

Thanks!

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Medical treatment of PCOS is tailored to the patient’s goals. Broadly, these may be considered under four categories:

Lowering of insulin levels
Restoration of fertility
Treatment of hirsutism or acne
Restoration of regular menstruation, and prevention of endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer
In each of these areas, there is considerable debate as to the optimal treatment. One of the major reasons for this is the lack of large scale clinical trials comparing different treatments. Smaller trials tend to be less reliable, and hence may produce conflicting results.

General interventions that help to reduce weight or insulin resistance can be beneficial for all these aims, because they address what is believed to be the underlying cause of the syndrome.

Dietary therapy
Where PCOS is associated with overweight or obesity, successful weight loss is probably the most effective method of restoring normal ovulation/menstruation, but many women find it very difficult to achieve and sustain significant weight loss. Low-carbohydrate diets and sustained regular exercise may help. Some experts recommend a low Glycemic index diet in which a significant part of total carbohydrates are obtained from fruit, vegetables and whole grain sources.[16]

Medications
Many women find insulin-lowering ([where insulin sensitivity is improved, and insulin resistance is reduced][1]) medications such as metformin hydrochloride (Glucophage), pioglitazone hydrochloride (Actos), and rosiglitazone maleate (Avandia) helpful, and ovulation may resume when they use these agents. Many women report that metformin use is associated with upset stomach, diarrhea, and weight-loss. Such side effects usually resolve within 2 to 3 weeks. Starting with a lower dosage and gradually increasing the dosage over 2 to 3 weeks and taking the medication toward the end of a meal may reduce side effects. It may take up to six months to see results, but when combined with exercise and a low glycemic index diet up to 85% will improve menstrual cycle regularity and ovulation.

While insulin sensitizing agents are often used for overweight patients, a cohort study has shown that metformin can also improve insulin resistance in thin PCOS patients without clinically apparent insulin resistance as measured by the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR).[17] Treatment of thin PCOS patients with 1500mg Metformin twice daily was shown to reduce HOMA-IR to 1.1 versus 1.7 in control groups. Besides positive effects on insulin resistance, metformin treatment was also shown to improve hirsutism, acne, and menstrual irregularities in thin PCOS patients.[17]

Treatment of infertility
Not all women with PCOS have difficulty becoming pregnant. For those who do, anovulation is a common cause. Ovulation may be predicted by the use of urine tests that detect the preovulatory LH surge, called ovulation predictor kits (OPKs). Charting of cervical mucus may also be used to predict ovulation, or certain fertility monitors (those that track urinary hormones or changes in saliva) may be used. Methods that predict ovulation may be used to time intercourse or insemination appropriately.

While not useful for predicting ovulation,[18] basal body temperatures may be used to confirm ovulation. Ovulation may also be confirmed by testing for serum progesterone in mid-luteal phase, approximately seven days after ovulation (if ovulation occurred on the average cycle day of fourteen, seven days later would be cycle day 21). A mid-luteal phase progesterone test may also be used to diagnose luteal phase defect. Methods that confirm ovulation may be used to evaluate the effectiveness of treatments to stimulate ovulation.

For overweight women with PCOS, who are anovulatory, diet adjustments and weight loss are associated with resumption of spontaneous ovulation. For those who after weightloss still are anovulatory or for anovulatory lean women, clomiphene citrate and FSH are the principal treatments used to help infertility. Previously, even metformin was recommended treatment for anovulation. But in the largest trial to date, comparing clomiphene with metformin, clomiphene alone was the most effective.[19] In this trial, 626 women were randomized to three groups: metformin alone, clomiphene alone, or both. The live-birth rates following 6 months of treatment were 7.2% (metformin), 22.5% (clomiphene), and 26.8% (both). The major complication of clomiphene was multiple pregnancy, affecting 0%, 6% and 3.1% of women respectively. The overall success rates for live birth remained disappointing, even in women receiving combined therapy, but it is important to consider that the women in this trial had already been attempting to conceive for an average of 3.5 years, and over half had received previous treatment for infertility. Thus, these were women with significant fertility problems, and the live-birth rates are probably not representative

Linda asks…

not sure when i am ovulating…please help!!?

last month my period came 4 days late. i usually start on the the 16th or 17th, but i started on the 21st. my ovulation chart says that i should ovulate today, but i have no eggwhite cm, which i usually do, and the ovulation test strips are still neg. i am having creamy cm, but thats it. we BD on july 2cd and plan to do it again when i get a positive ovulation test. are the tests just not working? could i have already ovulated? or how much longer do i have to ovulate this cycle?

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Ovulation charts where you simply put in your dates are completely inaccurate. If you want to be accurate you need to chart your body temp.

Ovulation tests detect the LH surge which happens 12-48 hours before ovulation. Ideally you want to have sex every 24-48 hours from 5 days before ovulation to one day after to have the highest chances of becoming pregnant.

If you haven’t had a positive ovulation test, and you haven’t had fertile cervical mucus, you haven’t ovulated.

There’s no way for any of us to know when you will ovulate though.

So ideally to increase your chances, try to have sex at least ever 48 hours until you get a positive ovulation test. When you get a positive ovulation test try to have sex ever 24 hours for the 72 hours following the first positive (positive can occur 48 hours before ovulation, egg can survive 24 hours).

Remember, plenty of fluids, DO NOT USE LUBE, orgasming helps a lot so have fun, and try and lie down for at least 20 minutes following sex, some women elevate their hips, you don’t have to though.

Carol asks…

When would I have ovulated?

I have been using OPK’s this month to try to figure out my cycle. I started testing on Day 10 of my cycle (normally a 29 day cycle) just to be sure. My OPK’s started showing a faint line on CD15 (which is still negative by OPK standards) and it was very positive on CD16. Then, on CD17 it was negative again. So does that mean I ovulated sometime between CD 16 & 17?
My husband and I only BD on CD 17, but we weren’t really “trying” this month, but we figured we’d give it a shot.
The reason I’m wondering is I was always so sure I ovulated on CD14 but that must not be the case. And would my OPK have remained positive until ovulation? So since it was negative on CD17 I can assume ovulation occurred?
And since we BD on the day it showed negative (after ovulation), how long would the egg be able to be fertilized? I’m just kind of hoping maybe we DID get it this month, but I’m not getting my hopes up!
Sorry if this is confusing. Thanks everyone! :o )

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

That makes perfect sense. That means you ovulated 13 days be for your period is do which is very normal. Yes they say count 14 days from the first day of last period but it is really 14 days be for next period. Of course with a 28 day cycle. You say you are 29 day cycle so like I said you ovulated 13 days be for next period. Wow that sounded like I just kept saying the same thing over and over. Sorry about that.
I would say if you got a positive then you either got ovulated or were about to ovulate. Luteinizing hormone is always present in our urine and increases just be for ovulation.When you have detected your LH surge you should ovulate within the next 24 to 36 hours. I just read that you are most likely to become pregnant if you have intercourse within 24-36 hours after you detect your lh surge. But of course also be for the surge as the sperm can live 3 days inside of a women if given a nice cozy place.

Mary asks…

Normal girls…………….?

is it normal to get 3 (+) on a ovulation test over 3 days?

period 1-5th feb 09
15th feb ==very clear(+)
16th ==clear(+)
17th ==never tested
18th ==very light (+) today

due next period 26th feb ( 8 days)
i have a 21-22 day cycle (3weeks)

is this normal?
xxxx
only had discharge.. and i mean alot of discharge on the 15th and cramps on and off on the 16th untill today.

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

It is possible, in a normal ovulation, to have a positive OPK for several days in a row. This is because LH peaks (surges) about 12-36 hours before ovulation occurs, and then dissipates. So, you could theoretically detect this high level of LH with positive OPK’s from the time it begins to the time it dissipates– over 36 hours.

It is also possible that your body is “gearing up” to ovulate, and you have an LH surge– and then, for some reason (such as stress, illness, travel, or random fluke), your body fails to release an egg . . . Then tries, tries again ASAP with another, or overlapping, surge. If you see a positive OPK for longer than 3 consecutive days, your egg is probably just having a little trouble getting out of the starting gate. If this happens to you occasionally, it’s no big deal. If it happens a lot, talk to your doctor.

Good Luck and baby dust! Xx

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Free Ovulation Calculator For 3 Months

Betty asks…

Can someone help me point my fertile days?

My menses are usually a week long and every 32 days.

The 1st day of my menses is today (23rd Jan). So, my next estimated cycle is on the 24th of Feb.

I’m really confuse of my fertile days! Is it different for everyone or what?? Help!

Thanks! =)

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Yes – everyone IS different. An online calculator won’t know your body. It only takes into consideration “averages”. Just for fun, I used one to calculate my last month’s ‘ovulation’. It gave me a date that was 3 days later than my actual ovulation date – had I gone by that only, we may well have missed ovulation.

Your best bet in pinpointing ovulation, and your most fertile time of the month, is to start charting and watching your fertility signs. Buy a basal thermometer and take your temp first thing every morning – at the same time every day – before you even get out of bed. Before you do anything at all. Note the temp. When you ovulate, your temp will rise and stay elevated above the pattern you note for pre-ovulation temps.

Charting is so much better than using some online ovulation predictor. Those things don’t know your body – you do. Every woman’s body is different, and the calculators don’t take that into consideration.

Your cervical mucus will typically tell you when ovulation is coming. It will be watery, or like egg whites. That’s the fertile stuff that keeps sperm alive while you are waiting to ovulate. This is also why you’re fertile for a few days ‘before’ ovulation. The sperm can live and lie in wait for the egg. Your egg will live for 12-24 hours after ovulation. And YES you CAN tell the difference between Egg White CM and leftover sperm if you had sex the night before. In a situation like that you want to do the water test. EWCM will sort of ball up and sink to the bottom and semen will float (with possibly some of it hanging down into the water). Also you can take true EWCM out of the water and still be able to stretch it.

You can also buy the ovulation strips to test for lueteinizing hormone (you’ll have a surge of it 12-36 hours before ovulation), but keep in mind that when you test for ovulation the test line must be *as dark or darker than the control line. * Two lines do not equal a positive on the ovulation tests.

Check out this site: http://www.fertilityfriend.com

There is a charting course there that you can take for free, and free software to chart your temps. The first day of your period is ‘cycle day 1.’ I typically ovulate on cycle day 12, but have actually ovulated on cycle day 10 before and as late as cycle day 15. This variation in ovulation days is why some women’s cycle lengths vary. The time between ovulation and your period (the ‘luteal’ phase) will not vary more than a day, maybe two. But the time between your period and ovulation can vary more than that. Chart a few cycles and you’ll see your own fertility pattern.

Best of luck to you!

Sandy asks…

What is my cycle? I get my period on the 12th of every month.?

When I count my days from the first day I get my period its 32 days but when I input that information on ovulation calendars, my next period never lands on the 12th? Ialways get my period on the 12th and I am never late.
If anyone can help me figure this out I’d really appreciate it.
My husband and I are ttc for two months now. I missed my period today which is very odd as I am never late but I tried using First Response pregnancy test and it showed negative.

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

The only way to pinpoint ovulation, and your most fertile time of the month, is to start charting and watching your fertility signs. Buy a basal thermometer and take your temp first thing every morning – at the same time every day – before you even get out of bed. Before you do anything at all. Note the temp. When you ovulate, your temp will rise and stay elevated above the pattern you note for pre-ovulation temps.

Charting is so much better than using some online ovulation predictor. Those things don’t know your body – you do. Every woman’s body is different, and the calculators don’t take that into consideration.

Your cervical mucus will typically tell you when ovulation is coming. It will be watery, or like egg whites. That’s the fertile stuff that keeps sperm alive while you are waiting to ovulate. This is also why you’re fertile for a few days ‘before’ ovulation. The sperm can live for 3-5 days and lie in wait for the egg. Your egg will live for 12-24 hours after ovulation.

You can also buy the ovulation strips to test for lueteinizing hormone (you’ll have a surge of it 12-36 hours before ovulation), but keep in mind that when you test for ovulation the test line must be *as dark or darker than the control line. * Two lines do not equal a positive on the ovulation tests.

Check out this site: http://www.fertilityfriend.com

There is a charting course there that you can take for free, and free software to chart your temps. The first day of your period is ‘cycle day 1.’ I typically ovulate on cycle day 12, but have actually ovulated on cycle day 10 before and as late as cycle day 15. This variation in ovulation days is why some women’s cycle lengths vary. Once again, the time between ovulation and your period (the ‘luteal’ phase) will not vary more than a day, maybe two. But the time between your period and ovulation can vary more than that. Chart a few cycles and you’ll see your own fertility pattern.

Good luck!

Ruth asks…

How long is it going to Take!?!?

I just got my IUD taken out a month ago, started my first period two days ago, does that mean I am fertile now and if so, when would my ovulation be, does that mean I can get pregnant? Can someone help, lol?

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Usually, menstruation means that you have ovulated. If you are ovulating you can get pregnant :-)

As for calculating when your will ovulate, that’s trickier. You will see calculators that will tell you the average date of ovulation for someone with a cycle length the same as yours. But, they are only averages, and you probably don’t know what your cycle length is yet.

For this first cycle at least, you may want to use OPKs – they usually tell you in the instructions which day to start using them. They test for a surge in the hormone that allows the egg to break out of the follicle (ovulation). The surge usually happens 12-36 hours before ovulation.

For any cycle, you can also chart fertile signs. Your cervical mucus gets watery and then stretchy like egg white as you approach ovulation. Your cervix rises and becomes high, soft and open as you get closer to ovulation. Neither of these signs is full proof, because you can get both when you are not ovulating, but they are still pretty good indicators. You can use BBT (basal body temperature) to tell you when you have ovulated. After ovulation, the dominant hormone is progesterone. This hormone causes a slight rise in your BBT. Get yourself a digital BBT thermometer – you can get one online or from a pharmacist. Take your temperature at around the same time everyday – keep the thermometer by your bed so you can take it as soon as you wake up, before you do anything else. The best days to BD are the few days leading up to ovulation, the day of ovulation, and the day after – sometimes you can release a second egg within 24 hours of the first – so the extra days BD is a good idea. Sperm can survive for up to 5 days in the right conditions – which is why even 3 days before ovulation is worth a shot.

You can chart your fertile signs and other symptoms online. I use fertilityfriend.com to chart. It includes lots of information and tools, and you can even look at other people’s charts (the ones they have chosen to post – don’t worry your info is private unless you want to share :-) ). There’s also a charting course (free – like much of the site) and a great community for support.

Good luck and baby dust :-)

Carol asks…

If I have a 45 day cycle, when SHOULD I ovulate?

I don’t even know if anyone can answer this, but I just thought I’d try. Thanks!

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Everyone is different. Do not buy in to the 14 day myth. A normal luteal phase is 10-16 days, so you *should* ovulate 10-16 days before your next period is due….BUT – many things can affect ovulation.

The only way to pinpoint ovulation, and your most fertile time of the month, is to start charting and watching your fertility signs. Buy a basal thermometer and take your temp first thing every morning – at the same time every day – before you even get out of bed. Before you do anything at all. Note the temp. When you ovulate, your temp will rise and stay elevated above the pattern you note for pre-ovulation temps.

Charting is so much better than using some online ovulation predictor. Those things don’t know your body – you do. Every woman’s body is different, and the calculators don’t take that into consideration.

Your cervical mucus will typically tell you when ovulation is coming. It will be watery, or like egg whites. That’s the fertile stuff that keeps sperm alive while you are waiting to ovulate. This is also why you’re fertile for a few days ‘before’ ovulation. The sperm can live for 3-5 days and lie in wait for the egg. Your egg will live for 12-24 hours after ovulation. And you can tell the difference between Egg White CM and leftover sperm if you had sex the night before. In a situation like that you want to do the water test. EWCM will sort of ball up and sink to the bottom and semen will float (with possibly some of it hanging down into the water). Also you can take true EWCM out of the water and still be able to stretch it.

You can also buy the ovulation strips to test for lueteinizing hormone (you’ll have a surge of it 12-36 hours before ovulation), but keep in mind that when you test for ovulation the test line must be *as dark or darker than the control line. * Two lines do not equal a positive on the ovulation tests.

Check out this site: http://www.fertilityfriend.com

There is a charting course there that you can take for free, and free software to chart your temps. The first day of your period is ‘cycle day 1.’ I typically ovulate on cycle day 12, but have actually ovulated on cycle day 10 before and as late as cycle day 15. This variation in ovulation days is why some women’s cycle lengths vary. Once again, the time between ovulation and your period (the ‘luteal’ phase) will not vary more than a day, maybe two. But the time between your period and ovulation can vary more than that. Chart a few cycles and you’ll see your own fertility pattern.

Good luck!

Susan asks…

When does a girl now when she is ovulating?

i am asking again cause i didn’t get the answer, it didn’t show up on my msn! thanks

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

A normal luteal phase is 10-16 days, so you *should* ovulate 10-16 days before your next period is due….BUT – many things can affect ovulation.

The only way to pinpoint ovulation, and your most fertile time of the month, is to start charting and watching your fertility signs. Buy a basal thermometer and take your temp first thing every morning – at the same time every day – before you even get out of bed. Before you do anything at all. Note the temp. When you ovulate, your temp will rise and stay elevated above the pattern you note for pre-ovulation temps.

Charting is so much better than using some online ovulation predictor. Those things don’t know your body – you do. Every woman’s body is different, and the calculators don’t take that into consideration.

Your cervical mucus will typically tell you when ovulation is coming. It will be watery, or like egg whites. That’s the fertile stuff that keeps sperm alive while you are waiting to ovulate. This is also why you’re fertile for a few days ‘before’ ovulation. The sperm can live for 3-5 days and lie in wait for the egg. Your egg will live for 12-24 hours after ovulation.

You can also buy the ovulation strips to test for lueteinizing hormone (you’ll have a surge of it 12-36 hours before ovulation), but keep in mind that when you test for ovulation the test line must be *as dark or darker than the control line. * Two lines do not equal a positive on the ovulation tests.

Check out this site: http://www.fertilityfriend.com

There is a charting course there that you can take for free, and free software to chart your temps. The first day of your period is ‘cycle day 1.’ I typically ovulate on cycle day 12, but have actually ovulated on cycle day 10 before and as late as cycle day 15. This variation in ovulation days is why some women’s cycle lengths vary. Once again, the time between ovulation and your period (the ‘luteal’ phase) will not vary more than a day, maybe two. But the time between your period and ovulation can vary more than that. Chart a few cycles and you’ll see your own fertility pattern.

Good luck!

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Lh Surge And Ovulation Chart

Sandy asks…

Peak on Clearblue but bbt chart not corresponding?

I got a peak reading on my clearblue monitor on CD18 and 19 however my bbt has not yet increased.Has that ever happ to anyone?Also the other fertility signs like CM has become sticky and CP has also become medium,so i knw that im not fertile anymore….but i dont knw why my bbt is not corresponding to the other signs…Also im on Clomid for the 1st time from CD 5-9.

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

The PEAK reading on your Clearblue fertility monitor means that it has detected the LH surge in your urine. The LH surge is the luteneising hormone you get just before you ovulate. It means you will ovulate around 24-36 hours later from the first positive LH surge. Your temperature won’t rise until AFTER you’ve ovulated, so that’s why your BBT chart isn’t corresponding with the CBFM’s Peak days. The Peak days don’t mean you’ve ovulated – they are giving you warning that you will do so in about 24-36 hours.

Ovulation will only be confirmed by BBT once you’ve had over 3 days of consecutively higher temps. The ovulation day is normally the lower one. You may well find that after CD20 your temps will rise.

I don’t know if you are charting your BBT on the Fertility Friend website, but it is very good in telling you when you ovulated.

Sandra asks…

if you are already pregnant and its to early to get a positive result yet ?

is its possible that the ferlity testing strips will not work………..because each time I test with the fertlity tests it comes back negative ? Please help
ovulation tests?

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

It’s possible, but I doubt that’s the issue. Most ovulation tests will turn positive if you’re pregnant.

You may not be ovulating at all or you’re missing your LH surge. It’s easy to miss. Around the time you think you will be ovulating, take 2 ovulation stripes per day.

Also chart bbt and look for ewcm to indicate/pinpoint ovulation.

Good luck!

Sharon asks…

CAN CLEARBLUE DIGITAL OVULATION KIT GIVE YOU FALSE POSITIVE?

does it ever show you a smiley face on a certain day when you are actually not ovulating on that day? is it possible?

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

I use CBE digital and have always gotten the smiley face when I ovulate. I also do BBT temp charting and the day after I get my smiley face I’ve always seen a rise in my temps, which is what indicates that ovulation happened.

The OPK can tell you that your body is getting ready to ovulate by detecting your LH surge, but it can’t absoultely prove that you DID ovulate. Only that your body got ready to.

Is there a reason you’re thinking you didn’t ovulate? You might want to consider BBT charting which is the only definitive way to prove you did ovulate by your temp rise.

Much dust to ya

Mary asks…

After you get a positive OPK, then you test again and get a lighter/negative one, is that a sign you ovulated?

I am temping etc. I guess what I am asking is should I continue to test, or if I was going to ovulate I likely did….

in other words once you ovulate, does the OPK go lighter again? I think that is best way to phrase what i am asking. Hope this makes sense.

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

A positive OPK means your LH is surging, and you should ovulate within 12-48 hours. The fact that the surge is going down means your should be ovulating right now.

Here’s a chart that clearly shows hormone changes in relation to ovulation, and when LH does come down in relation to ovulation.

Http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cd/MenstrualCycle2.png

If your temp shoots up tomorrow, then no need to take another ovulation test, if it doesnt, then it might be good to keep on taking them until you get a temp shift with charting.

Good luck!

Carol asks…

With PCOS what steps of fertility treatment do you take?

I am currently seeing Dr. Seth Katz with Reach Fertility Clinic. I have had an HSG Test, and I have also tried Clomid Estradiol and Prochieve. Please let me know what else they can do for me? I am currently overweight and i have been working to correct this problem even though it has not happened yet.. I currently take 2000 mg of metformin a day..

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Here is what I’ve found while dealing with PCOS and TTC, some of it may apply to you, some may not, just my observations/findings:

1) Chart. You need to know if you’re ovulating. With PCOS you can get the LH surge (ie test positive on an ovulation predictor strip), but not ovulate. The best way to determine if you ovulated is your basal body temperature. If it goes up and stays up you O’d (not the fun kind, but the important kind).

2) Insulin is the devil. Especially for you, because PCOS and Insulin Resistance are twin sisters and they hate you. If your insulin resistance is fair to normal, you can control it with diet. Lower carb, no sugar/flour, lots of fruits and veggies. Good book to check out is Fertility Foods by Jeremy Groll. Designed for PCOS.

3) If your insulin resistance is pretty bad and diet isn’t doing the trick, you may need some drugs to help out Metformin/Glucophage is a big helper. If that doesn’t do the trick Actos can be brought to the party.

4) Did I mention charting? You really need to know if you’re ovulating or not. Because if not, you may need some ovarian stimulation ala Clomid/Femara. It’s dirt cheap as these things go and is pretty effective with the PCOS set. I personally have gotten pregnant with Clomid and am on Femara now.

5) Take your vitamins. Start your prenatals now. They help. And they do wonders for your hair and nails.

6) Exercise. I know it sucks, but it really helps with the insulin resistance. You need 150 minutes of exercise a week, preferably 100 minutes of cardio and 50 of strength training. Muscles are good for fighting insulin resistance. This is the area where I really suck at meeting my goals.

7) If you’re overweight, lose some weight. A loss of just 5% can have a tremendous impact on your insulin resistance.
8) Use full fat dairy if you use dairy at all. The lower fat dairy has a disproportionately high level of androgen hormones which can exacerbate PCOS.

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Length Of Lh Surge During Ovulation

Sandra asks…

when is a dogs heat over!?

my female and male dog are seperated right now cause my female went into heat. My male is going CRAZY! he constantly whines when in or out of the house! its driving me nutz! he was fine last week but this week he is out of control going crazy!

I know what everyone is going to say… to get her fixed. I havent because I am looking into finding a new home for her because my relationship is failing and I dont have any options and just cant care for her right now. With work and trying to find an apartment- she is a big dog and needs a backyard. So I didnt get her fixed in case the next owner doesnt want her fixed.

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Sexually mature female dogs will go through a heat cycle once, or more commonly, twice a year. Each cycle consists of four stages:

1. Proestrus: Characterized by swelling of the vulva and release of a bloody vaginal discharge. Sometimes the discharge is milky and other times dark red (or somewhere in between in colour). Between bitches, there is a large variation in the length of proestrus, with an average length of 9 days, and a range of 1 to 17 days. This is the “pre-heat” during which the male is progressively more attracted to the female, but the female still rejects the male. This is a high female hormone (estrogen) stage.

2. Estrus: This phase is often termed standing heat because it is during this stage that the female will receive the male dog. Average length for estrus is 9 days, but again, between dogs there is large variation (range 3 to 21 days). At this point, the discharge may be absent, or perhaps straw coloured. This stage is characterized by an increase in progesterone hormone and an LH (luteinizing hormone) surge that leads to ovulation.

3. Diestrus: At this point, the female usually no longer stands for the male, especially further into the diestrus stage. Vaginal discharge tapers off and the diestrus phase lasts an average of about 60 days. Diestrus begins 6 days after ovulation. Progesterone hormones remain high throughout this phase.

4. Anestrus: This is the resting phase between the active portions of the cycles. It normally lasts about 5 months.

Hopefully that answers all of your questions. If not surely one of the sources that I listed below can help you out.

Maria asks…

Another Ovulation Question?

I am doing the OPK I am cd11 when do you think i should see an LH surge my cycle is usually 28-29 day cycle

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

What is ovulation?

Ovulation is the release of a single, mature egg from a follicle that developed in the ovary. It usually occurs regularly, around day 14 of a 28-day menstrual cycle. Once released, the egg is capable of being fertilized for 12 to 48 hours before it begins to disintegrate. This is the most fertile period of your cycle: during ovulation your chances of conception are highest.

When does ovulation occur?

Ovulation usually takes place 14 days after the beginning of your menstrual cycle. The time of ovulation within the menstrual cycle is determined by the luteal phase, which is usually 12 to 16 days long. You can calculate the time of ovulation within your cycle by subtracting the length of your luteal phase from the length of your cycle. For example, if your cycle is 28 days long and your luteal phase is 12 days long, the ovulation will occur on day 16 of your cycle (28-12=16). The exact time of ovulation may vary within your cycle, because ovulation can be delayed by a number of factors such as stress, illness, diet, or increased physical activity.

How does ovulation determine my fertile days?

Your fertile period starts about 4-5 days before ovulation, and ends about 24-48 hours after it. This is because sperm can live in your body for approximately 4 to 5 days, and the egg can live for 24 to 48 hours after being released. You are most fertile on the day before and the day of ovulation. Knowing your fertile days can help you increase your chances of getting pregnant, or avoid an unwanted pregnancy. Read Ovulation and Pregnancy and Ovulation and Contraception for more information.

How do I calculate my fertile days using Ovulation Calendar?

Ovulation Calendar calculates your fertile days based on your menstrual cycle data. To use Ovulation Calendar you need to enter the first day of your last period, the length of your menstrual cycle, and the length of your luteal phase if you know it. Based on these data, Ovulation Calendar generates your personal daily fertility chart showing the fertile days in green:

Read these topics to learn how Ovulation Calendar can help you:

Avoiding pregnancy
Getting pregnant
Conceiving a boy
Conceiving a girl

Can I feel ovulation?

You may experience lower abdominal discomfort, a slight rise in body temperature, and changes in cervical mucus during ovulation. Prior to ovulation, your cervical mucus is cloudy and thicker, and a few days before ovulation it becomes clear, slippery, and stretchy like raw egg whites. Immediately following ovulation, your body temperature can increase by 0.4 to 1.0 degrees Fahrenheit. About 20% of women feel discomfort or pain in their lower abdomen as the egg leaves the ovary. This condition is known as ‘mittelschmerz’, and it usually lasts from a few minutes to several hours.

What happens in my body during ovulation?

The process of ovulation is triggered by the release of Luteinizing Hormone (LH). The levels of this hormone increase significantly about 1-2 days before ovulation, causing the egg to be released from the ovary (this increase is known as the ‘LH surge’). The egg travels down the fallopian tube towards the uterus. If fertilization does not occur within 24 to 48 hours after ovulation, the egg disintegrates and is expelled with the uterus lining at the start of your next period, usually 12-16 days later. If fertilization occurs, the egg implants itself in the lining of the uterus and begins its growth, resulting in a pregnancy.

Linda asks…

Im TTC but i got my period today(feb.10,2008).I think my two sisters got pregnant close to their periods.?

what would be the best time to have sex when ovulation occurs during my period time ? thanks.

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

It is physically impossible to ovulate when you are on your period. Regardless of length of cycle, every woman ovulates 14 days prior to her period. It always takes 14 days after ovulation for the period to begin, due to the hormonal changes that need to occur to bring on a period. This doesn’t mean you can’t get pregnant near your expected period, it just means that you ovulated later than normal, and so if you hadn’t conceived your period will be later than expected. The best thing to do is take at home ovulation tests (purchase at any pharmacy) – just a stick you pee on at the same time every day (usually afternoon) and that will detect your LH surge (the hormone that releases the egg) so you will have a better idea of when to try. Depending on how regular your cycle is, you may need to use a lot of these (I have an irregular cycle that averages 40 days, and used 3 boxes the month I finally conceived). Good luck – I know it’s hard to be patient!

Ruth asks…

Clearblue Fertility Monitor – Programmed for 2 Peak & 2 High?

I’ve been reading a lot of the questions/answers regarding the CBF Monitor and I’ve seen this a couple of times – - – that the monitor is programmed to give you two peak days, then two high days and then go back to low. Therefore folks have stated to stop testing after your first peak day. Is this true? Reason I ask is b/c on my day 9 I was low and then day 10 & 11 I was PEAK (with no high days inbetween). Today, day 12, I’m high. Thoughts? Should I stop testing?
And one more question for you – On my first peak day (day 10), my husband & I ‘baby danced’ that night; did not on day 11. Thoughts on that as well?
Sorry for all the questions… Thanks in advance!

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

An over the counter conception aid that can help you maximize your chances of conceiving your baby better than any other method. It is the most advanced technology available without a prescription. It is the first and only palm-sized electronic system that monitors your personal hormones to provide you with an unmistakable display of your personal level of fertility every day of your cycle. The Clearblue Easy Fertility Monitor measures 2 key hormones to more accurately identify more fertile days than any other over the counter method while storing your personalized data for up to six cycles.

How accurate is the Clearblue Easy Fertility Monitor?
In laboratory testing, the Monitor was found to be 99% accurate in detecting the LH surge.
It is important to remember that there are no products available that can guarantee success in achieving pregnancy. The Clear Blue Easy Fertility Monitor is suitable for women whose natural monthly cycle normally lasts between 21 to 42 days in length. If you have intercourse during High and Peak Fertility days it can help you maximize your chances of conceiving your baby.

It is important to remember that there are no products available that can guarantee success in achieving pregnancy. The Clear Blue Easy Fertility Monitor is suitable for women whose natural monthly cycle normally lasts between 21 to 42 days in length. If you have intercourse during High and Peak Fertility days it can help you maximize your chances of conceiving your baby.

It is important to remember that there are no products available that can guarantee success in achieving pregnancy. The Clear Blue Easy Fertility Monitor is suitable for women whose natural monthly cycle normally lasts between 21 to 42 days in length. If you have intercourse during High and Peak Fertility days it can help you maximize your chances of conceiving your baby.

It tracks 2 hormones, estrogen and LH through urine samples. After inserting the test sticks into the unit, a result will given as to whether you are in a Low, High, or Peak Fertile period. This unit stores your information for several months.
Who Should Use It:

You are fairly regular
You are looking for a method that requires no self interpretation, as it does all the work for you.
You may still use the ClearPlan Easy Fertility Monitor if you are taking Clomid, but please be aware that the Fertility Monitor may not reliably detect High Fertility. However, it may still be possible to detect Peak Fertility. Therefore, if you are taking Clomid and trying to conceive, you may still benefit from using the ClearPlan Easy Fertility Monitor, but consult with your physician first. In a recent study on patients using the ClearPlan Easy Fertility Monitor while taking Clomid, some patients did experience more High Fertility days when taking Clomid but their Peak Fertility days were still accurately identified.
You Should Not Use It If::

Your doctor has determined that you are not ovulating spontaneously
Your cycles are shorter than 22 days or longer than 42 days.
Your cycles are erratic and very irregular
You have been diagnosed with PCOS
You have recently been pregnant, are currently/recently stopped breast feeding, stopped using hormonal contraception. You should have at least 2 natural cycles before using this product.
You have impaired kidney function
You can not reliably take the test the same time every morning.
You are on anti-biotics that contains tetracyclines
You are using hormonal contraception, certain fertility treatments (especially those containing hCG and LH) and hormone replacement therapy.

The New And Advanced OV-Watch® is worn on the woman’s wrist while she sleeps. Women start wearing OV-Watch® on the 1st, 2nd, or 3rd day of their menstrual cycle and wear it through ovulation. It measures a woman’s changes in her chloride ion levels that are secreted in perspiration every 30 minutes and records up to 12 readings per period.

OVWatch’s patented technology detects the chloride ion surge and alerts the woman to FERTILE DAY 1, FERTILE DAY 2, FERTILE DAY 3, FERTILE DAY 4, OVULATION DAY 1, and the day after. It is the ONLY device of its kind that can give you the 4 days BEFORE ovulation. That can make all the difference when you are trying to conceive.

Please see the User Reference Guide for complete instructions on “how to start your next cycle”. OVWatch® can be used for this pregnancy and subsequent pregnancies, and unlike urine based products can be shared with a friend after you are pregnant.

With OV-Watch’s Advanced Technology, you will get Advanced Notice of ovulation. It is a common misconception for couples trying to conceive that they should only have intercourse when the female is ovulating. It is true that the time of ovulation is when the sperm fertilizes the egg for conception; however, the day of ovulation is not the only day that is considered “fertile”.

According to several published medical articles the highest probability of conception occurs with intercourse on the days prior to ovulation, rather than the day of ovulation itself. Most health experts believe a woman’s cervical mucus is at its most fertile stage in the days before ovulation1. And since sperm is reported to live for 6 days in the genital tract, having intercourse on those four days before ovulation may hold a woman’s highest probability of conception for that month.

OV-Watch differs from the LH urine stick tests, in that it detects the 4 crucial days before ovulation, as opposed to the LH test sticks that simply detect the LH surge that is 12-24 hours before ovulation.

Using urine strips and charting temperature to identify when you are ovulating can be messy, inconvenient, and may lead to inaccurate results. Urine testing for the LH surge may miss ovulation in up to one third of women. A woman’s LH surge is detected in the urine only 12-24 hours before ovulation.

Only OV-Watch’s patented technology can find the 4 days before you ovulate in an easy to use, lightweight, wrist -mounted fertility predictor. Those 4 days do make all the difference when trying to conceive. Why waste any more time.

Laura asks…

why do ovulation occur from alternate ovary every month?

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

What is Ovulation?
Ovulation refers to a specific phase in your menstrual cycle. Known as the ovulatory phase, it is during this time that your body releases an egg for fertilization. During the ovulatory phase, your body sends a series of signals that trigger an increase in the levels of estrogen in your body. In turn, this increase sets off a rise in luteinizing hormone (called the LH surge), a special hormone that helps you ovulate. When this LH surge reaches a certain point, one of your ovaries releases an egg. This egg will then travel down the fallopian tubes in order to be fertilized.

When Does Ovulation Occur?
It can be hard to predict exactly when ovulation occurs. This is because every woman’s cycle is different and can even vary individually from month to month. Typically, it is assumed that every woman has a cycle around 28 days in length. However, your cycle may last anywhere from 21 to 35 days in length. Ovulation occurs at different times in different women, depending upon the length of your menstrual cycle.

A good rule of thumb is to remember that ovulation typically takes place about two weeks before menstruation. This means that, if you have a 28-day cycle, you will ovulate around Day 14. However, few women ovulate like clockwork. As a result, ovulation can occur anywhere from Day 8 to Day 20 depending on the length of your cycle. In order to find out when you ovulate, it is necessary to look closely at specific signs that your body gives off.

Why You Need to Know
So why would you want to know when you are ovulating in the first place? Well, women find that knowing when they ovulate helps to provide them with control over their own fertility. Knowing when you ovulate can help you:

* Track your menstrual period: Keeping track of your ovulation will help you to predict when your menstruation is going to arrive, so you won’t be caught off guard. It is also especially useful for women with irregular periods or endometriosis, who often don’t ovulate.
* Get Pregnant: It is during ovulation that you are at your most fertile. If you are trying to get pregnant, timing intercourse around your ovulation can greatly increase your chances of conception.
* Preventing Pregnancy: Women who are sexually active but who don’t want to get pregnant sometimes monitor their ovulation in order to prevent pregnancy. By refraining from sexual intercourse around the time of ovulation, you can reduce your chances of getting pregnant.

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