Ovulation Calculator 3 Months Luteal Phase

Betty asks…

question about fertility window.?

Online when they give you a fertility window, does that mean you could ovulate anytime during that window?

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Online ovulation calculators *might* give you a general idea, but every woman is unique. The reason you are given a ‘window’ is because sperm can live in your body for 3-5 days in wait for the egg.

Your best bet in pinpointing ovulation, and your most fertile time of the month, is to start charting and watching your fertility signs. Buy a basal thermometer and take your temp first thing every morning – at the same time every day – before you even get out of bed. Before you do anything at all. Note the temp. When you ovulate, your temp will rise and stay elevated above the pattern you note for pre-ovulation temps.

Charting is so much better than using some online ovulation predictor. Those things don’t know your body – you do. Every woman’s body is different, and the calculators don’t take that into consideration. For instance, I used one a couple days ago – just for giggles….It said I would ovulate Dec 5th. I ovulated the 3rd. I could have well missed my ovulation date if I’d gone by that.

Your cervical mucus will typically tell you when ovulation is coming. It will be watery, or like egg whites. That’s the fertile stuff that keeps sperm alive while you are waiting to ovulate. This is also why you’re fertile for a few days ‘before’ ovulation. The sperm can live and lie in wait for the egg. Your egg will live for 12-24 hours after ovulation.

You can also buy ovulation strips to test for lueteinizing hormone (you’ll have a surge of it 12-36 hours before ovulation), but keep in mind that when you test for ovulation the test line must be *as dark or darker than the control line. * Two lines do not equal a positive on the ovulation tests.

Check out this site: http://www.fertilityfriend.com

There is a charting course there that you can take for free, and free software to chart your temps. The first day of your period is ‘cycle day 1.’ I typically ovulate on cycle day 12, but have actually ovulated on cycle day 10 before and as late as cycle day 15. This variation in ovulation days is why some women’s cycle lengths vary. The time between ovulation and your period (the ‘luteal’ phase) will not vary more than a day, maybe two. But the time between your period and ovulation can vary more than that. Chart a few cycles and you’ll see your own fertility pattern.

Helen asks…

trying for baby number two?

ive always had regular periods, i started noting down my periods in september as me and my hubby want another baby, i had a period on 4th sep-8th sep, 23rd of sep i had unprotected sex, but i was on the pill but now taking it at the same times or not taking at all :s… i started my october period on 6th untill 12th.. 5 days later i started spotting and brown spotting for 3 days with abdomanal cramps had temp for two days, it all stopped for 6 days, the last three days of october i was in pain and having brown spotting, 1st november i started bleeding again, finished on the 3rd, but im getting pregnacy symptoms, sore boobs, nausea, back pains, feeling for certain foods, done 4 tests all negative…. so :s dont know what to do, and dont know my ovulation cyle no more…. help please
THANKS GUYS GREAT ADVICE, ILL KEEP YOU UPDATED 🙂

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

You need to start tracking your periods on mymonthlycycles.com. Thats what I use. You enter in your periods and it will tell you what your average cycle length is. Then when you click on ovulation calculator it will tell you your fertile window and approximate ovulation date. I have mine set up to send me email reminders when Im ovulating or about to start my period. Ive used it for 7 months and now know my average cycle length is 33 days and it is usually pretty accurate. Also buy some OPKs (ovulation predictor kits) to figure out how long your luteal phase is (the length of time between your ovulation and your next period). This will help you figure out when the best time to have sex is in order to get pregnant. If you need support for trying to conceive, justmommies.com is great. Good luck and I hope you get a big fat positive soon!

Maria asks…

dna!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!?

i had sex with my ex on october 13 shortly after that i got my period. then 2 weeks later i had sex with my homeboy….. so which one is the father

the doctor said i conceived the last week in oct.
baby due on july 21

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

It could be either. Sometimes women have their period through the first trimester (3 months) of pregnancy.

Every woman’s luetal phase is different. Ovulation is not something that can be predicted simply by dates.

Please go to these sites for more info:

http://www.mymonthlycycles.com/lutealcalc.jsp

http://www.ovulation-calculator.com/luteal.htm

And, honestly your due date is simply an estimate. It is common for babies to be born anywhere from 36 weeks – 42 weeks. The way your doctor calculates the due date is by using the day YOU told him you had your last period. Also, with only having sex two weeks apart, an ultrasound will not show a difference.

You are going to need to have a paternity test done afterwards, unless you are married or one of the two guys wants to sign the birth certificate and claim the baby is his.

Sorry, I know that is probably not what you are wanting to hear.

Carol asks…

wanting to conceive?

i really want to conceive i came on my period 22nd feb and lasts upto 5 days so ending 26th feb whens the best time to have sex my periods are on a 28 day cycle could anyone tell me what days are best and how long

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Everyone is different. Do not buy in to the 14 day myth. A normal luteal phase is 10-16 days, so you *should* ovulate 10-16 days before your next period is due….BUT – many things can affect ovulation.

The only way to pinpoint ovulation, and your most fertile time of the month, is to start charting and watching your fertility signs. Buy a basal thermometer and take your temp first thing every morning – at the same time every day – before you even get out of bed. Before you do anything at all. Note the temp. When you ovulate, your temp will rise and stay elevated above the pattern you note for pre-ovulation temps.

Charting is so much better than using some online ovulation predictor. Those things don’t know your body – you do. Every woman’s body is different, and the calculators don’t take that into consideration.

Your cervical mucus will typically tell you when ovulation is coming. It will be watery, or like egg whites. That’s the fertile stuff that keeps sperm alive while you are waiting to ovulate. This is also why you’re fertile for a few days ‘before’ ovulation. The sperm can live for 3-5 days and lie in wait for the egg. Your egg will live for 12-24 hours after ovulation. And you can tell the difference between Egg White CM and leftover sperm if you had sex the night before. In a situation like that you want to do the water test. EWCM will sort of ball up and sink to the bottom and semen will float (with possibly some of it hanging down into the water). Also you can take true EWCM out of the water and still be able to stretch it.

You can also buy the ovulation strips to test for lueteinizing hormone (you’ll have a surge of it 12-36 hours before ovulation), but keep in mind that when you test for ovulation the test line must be *as dark or darker than the control line. * Two lines do not equal a positive on the ovulation tests.

Check out this site: http://www.fertilityfriend.com

There is a charting course there that you can take for free, and free software to chart your temps. The first day of your period is ‘cycle day 1.’ I typically ovulate on cycle day 12, but have actually ovulated on cycle day 10 before and as late as cycle day 15. This variation in ovulation days is why some women’s cycle lengths vary. Once again, the time between ovulation and your period (the ‘luteal’ phase) will not vary more than a day, maybe two. But the time between your period and ovulation can vary more than that. Chart a few cycles and you’ll see your own fertility pattern.

Good luck!

Mary asks…

IF ANYONE CAN HELP ME WITH TRYING TO CONCIVE WITH ANY OTHER INFORMATION THAT I DON’T ALREADY KNOW….PLAESE!!!?

i can’t really tell when i’m ovulating cuz i have those pains everyday and the doctor says nothing is wrong…but i think something is…i been trying to have a baby for a year and a half and still nothing..i do my calender and postion and everything these web sites tell me to but that was the first time that ever happen…with me bleeding…after my calender told me last night it was the most ferlity day to concive

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

The only way to pinpoint ovulation, and your most fertile time of the month, is to start charting and watching your fertility signs. Buy a basal thermometer and take your temp first thing every morning – at the same time every day – before you even get out of bed. Before you do anything at all. Note the temp. When you ovulate, your temp will rise and stay elevated above the pattern you note for pre-ovulation temps.

Charting is so much better than using some online ovulation predictor. Those things don’t know your body – you do. Every woman’s body is different, and the calculators don’t take that into consideration.

Your cervical mucus will typically tell you when ovulation is coming. It will be watery, or like egg whites. That’s the fertile stuff that keeps sperm alive while you are waiting to ovulate. This is also why you’re fertile for a few days ‘before’ ovulation. The sperm can live for 3-5 days and lie in wait for the egg. Your egg will live for 12-24 hours after ovulation.

You can also buy the ovulation strips to test for lueteinizing hormone (you’ll have a surge of it 12-36 hours before ovulation), but keep in mind that when you test for ovulation the test line must be *as dark or darker than the control line. * Two lines do not equal a positive on the ovulation tests.

Check out this site: http://www.fertilityfriend.com

There is a charting course there that you can take for free, and free software to chart your temps. The first day of your period is ‘cycle day 1.’ I typically ovulate on cycle day 12, but have actually ovulated on cycle day 10 before and as late as cycle day 15. This variation in ovulation days is why some women’s cycle lengths vary. The time between ovulation and your period (the ‘luteal’ phase) will not vary more than a day, maybe two. (A ‘normal’ phase is anything between 10 and 16 days) But the time between your period and ovulation can vary more than that. Chart a few cycles and you’ll see your own fertility pattern.

Good luck!

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