Ovulation Calculator 3 Months Luteal Phase

Maria asks…

How can i tell how long my Luetal phase is?

My last period was Oct. 2nd – 6th with a 33 day cycle length! Im somewhere around 3 weeks late but idk exactly how late i am? I was fertile around Oct. 18th-22nd an i had sex on all the days i should have an all ive been doin since i was supposed to start my period is spot off an on goin from light red to light brown an sometimes a little darker brown no cramping or anything! Idk if im pregnant cuz i aint taken a test yet or if my period are just goin stupid on me?? But how can yall tell the luetal phase?
k thanx guys i think mine is 14 but im not exactly sure but i will go to goolge an type that in thanx for the baby dust an baby dust to yall too!

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Your luteal phase is the the days from the day after ovulation, to the day before the first day of your period. The first day of your period is not considered part of your luteal phase, it’s day 1 of a new cycle. So to know how long your LP is, you need to know the day you ovulate. You can find out your ovulation day by charting your temps, using ovulation predictor kits, or a fertility monitor.

My luteal phase is 12 days long counting from the day after I ovulate to the day before my period shows. LP’s are normally anywhere form 10-16 days long. Anything shorter than 10 would be considered a luteal phase defect, and it may not allow enough time for a successful implantation. The LP rarely changes, it stays the same every month, but may vary by a day or 2 on a rare occasion. If you know the day you ovulate, and are confused on the counting, you can google luteal phase calculators, put in the day you ovulated, the first day of your period, and it will calculate it for you. Good luck and lots of baby dust 🙂

Laura asks…

Confused …help!!!!!?

Hi Ladies…
I am in a doubt……..I usually have a 30 day cycle +/- 2 days….But from the time we have started TTC, my cycle is somewhat getting longer..let me explain..period dates..
sept 14th
oct 15
nov 16
dec 21
In this, I am unable to calculate how long is my cycle. I wanted to know so that I can use the ovulation calendars on the internet. Also, when is the best days to BD in order to get pregnant..I know abt tracking the CM and OPKs and all…But just want to know a bit more to be sure I dont miss this time 🙂

Lots of baby dust to all of u..

Happy New Year!!

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Your best bet in pinpointing ovulation, and your most fertile time of the month, is to start charting and watching your fertility signs. Buy a basal thermometer and take your temp first thing every morning – at the same time every day – before you even get out of bed. Before you do anything at all. Note the temp. When you ovulate, your temp will rise and stay elevated above the pattern you note for pre-ovulation temps. The day you ovulate is the day BEFORE the temperature rise. And you ovulate for one day – it takes mere moments.

Charting is so much better than using some online ovulation predictor. Those things don’t know your body – you do. Every woman’s body is different, and the calculators don’t take that into consideration. For giggles, I used one to calculate last month’s ovulation date…it was 3 days off. This month’s…4 days off. So, no, I don’t trust them AT all.

Using both basal body temp and OPK’s works very well. The OPK tells you when ovulation is coming, and the temp tells you when it’s passed.

Check out this site: http://www.fertilityfriend.com

There is a charting course there that you can take for free, and free software to chart your temps. The first day of your period is ‘cycle day 1.’ I typically ovulate on cycle day 12, but have actually ovulated on cycle day 10 before and as late as cycle day 15. This variation in ovulation days is why some women’s cycle lengths vary. The time between ovulation and your period (the ‘luteal’ phase) will not vary more than a day, maybe two. But the time between your period and ovulation can vary more than that. Chart a few cycles and you’ll see your own fertility pattern.

Best of luck to you!

Mandy asks…

hi girls sorry about the ? not yelling just a habbit?

OK I HAVE A QUESTION. THAT IS WHEN I WAS USING THE RESTROOM I NOTICED WHEN I WHIPED THERE WAS SOMETHING GOOIE. AND I HEARD THAT WHEN THAT HAPPENS YOU ARE OVULATING. THE COLOR WAS LIKE A TAN ALMOST COLOR OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT. WELL ANYWAYS I WAS WONDERING IT THAT IS TRUE CAUSE I HAVE NO IDEA WHEN I OVULATE. SO LIKE I SAID I WAS WONDERING CAUSE I’M TRYING TO GET PREGNANT. SO WE HAD SEX THAT NIGHT. IF THAT IS TRUE MOST LIKELY I WILL BE PREGNANT RIGHT. OH ANOTHER THING LAST MONTH I DID THE OVULATION THING WITH THE CALENDER ON THE WEB AND IT STATED THAT I WOULD OVULATE BETWEEN MAY 27TH AND JUNE 1ST SO WE HAD SEX WITHIN THAT TIME AND I DIDNT COME OUT PREGNANT. AND I DONT KNOW WHEN I OVULATE BUT I WAS PAYING ATTENTION TO THAT GOOIE THING IS IT POSSIBLE?????? PLEASE HELP ME BY ANSWERING MY QUESTION! THANKS IN ADVANCE.

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

There are a whole lot of commercial products to help you figure out your ovulation pattern. Every woman is different, and it can range anywhere from 1-3 weeks before your period – even more for people with certain conditions. The best thing to do is start with a good site like my source to keep track of your information. A calculator is just an estimate based on 14 days. Unfortunately since everyone is different, it is very likely to be wrong for you. Then get yourself a BBT thermometer to confirm you are ovulating. Taking your BBT involves a $9 thermometer and popping a thermometer in your mouth immediately when you wake each morning (you can take temps vaginally, too). Your temp will be lower before you ovulate, and you will notice a sharp increase of at least .3 degrees F in most cases the day after ovulation and a sharp drop the day of or before you get your period. This is caused by the production of the heat inducing and pregnancy maintaining hormone progesterone during the luteal phase (the time after ovulation). Unfortunately, this will not predict ovulation, it will only confirm it, so you will need at least one more thing, and that depends on your time/money split. If you have a little cash and don’t want to spend a lot of time, purchase a Clear Blue Easy Fertility Monitor. This excellent invention allows you to saturate a stick much like a home pregnancy midstream style test and put it in an electronic reader. You will have to do this 10-20 days per month and use your first morning urine. It will tell you if you are low, high, or peak that day and if it says high or peak you should try to have sex. It remembers and compares up to 6 months of your personal data and there is even a data retrieval service for your doctor if needed (it detects estrogen and LH levels). The CBEFM gives warning of 4-6 fertile days and gets more and more precise with each month of use. It costs $125-200 and a pack of 30 sticks (1.5-3 month supply) cost $30-40. If you have less money but more time, check out www.saveontests.com and get a pack of LH detecting ovulation strips for as little as $0.30 each. These are a bit of a pain because you must restrict fluid intake for 3 hours in the AM (after first morning urine) and then take them once or twice a day between 10-8 for the average schedule and when all is said and done, they give you only 24-48 hours notice. You can also use an ovulation microscope that detects estrogen in your saliva. This can be used with the strips to extend the warning time you have as the microscope often gives about 4-5 days warning. You will use first morning saliva and look through the scope for a ferning pattern. I suggest the fertility tracker. At $50 it is easier to use and compare data than the mini-microscopes that cost $20-40. Cervical mucus and position are backup methods of ovulation prediction because they are unreliable but can add a clearer picture if they line up with the other readings you are getting. The problem with them is that a woman will often have several patches of watery or egg-white CM in a given cycle – sometimes even after she ovulates. The best thing to do is chart with the most information possible so you know the exact right time.

Sandy asks…

Can someone interpret my chart please? PLEASE!?

I’m so confused. FF moved my crosshairs from the 19th to the 29th.. I was due for my AF on may 3rd (my last period was april 1st) and every calculator i use says i am due may 3 and i know myself that i was due may 3 because my cycles are always regular. Even if my ovulation date moved, i KNOW that my period due date would stay the same because nothing can change it. So what the heck is going on???? I seem to fail at everything!! My first month charting and i thought everything was going fine but now i’m so confused and upset and I have NO ONE to talk to. I have no idea what DPO i actually am now. SOMEONE PLEASE HELP. I’m super depressed my hormones are EVERYWHERE this month and my poor poor husband… he can’t even talk to me about it because he doesn’t know how this works and i’m so emotional just ups and downs ups and downs. Please I need some guidance or reassurance of some kind. OFC i wanted to achieve pregnancy but now it’s come down to just achieving a normal cycle!!

http://www.fertilityfriend.com/home/272d85 <<<<—-
edit: also I have never ovulated this late or had this long of a cycle. has FF been known to be wrong?
edit#2 since this is my first month to chart it i'm going by feeling and putting my symptoms on a calendar in my purse.. my LP has never been under 10 days and never been over 16 i noticed that from the start of my ovulation i ALWAYS get slight cramping every day for two weeks and then my period starts. this cycle is NUTS or FF is i swear by it

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

FF can be wrong- but I’m not sure they are on this occasion. How long is your luteal phase normally? Cos that’s a big drop for 6DPO. I’ve had a look and I think this is probably when you Oed, given the cervix position and texture as well. Also CD29 is the only point I can see in that cycle where there is a definite thermal shift and a biphasic pattern.

The only other possible likely days would be CD16 or CD19, but I don’t think this is as you’ve had negative tests since then and your luteal phase would be very very long if this was the case. I think you probably just ovulated later than usual this cycle- it happens to nearly all women at least once and is not normally any cause for concern.

Sharon asks…

Basal Body Temp? what and how?

this may see dumb but im TTC and im supposed to chart my BBT, is this just my regular temp or is it something else how do i check it a normal thermometer or some different one, please help thanks!!

Pregnancy Advisor’s answers:

Hey no need to feel dumb… I just started charting my BBT… And u can use regular thermometer off course. But it must be a digital one so that u can accurately measure the temperature. I am using http://ovulation-calculator.com/ttc-tools/charting.php to chart my BBT.
Charting your BBTs is really pretty easy. Basically, what you are doing is taking your temperature first thing each day and plotting the temperature on a chart. What you are looking for is to see a shift of at least .4 degrees Fahrenheit after ovulation making your chart biphasic (showing low temperatures before ovulation in the follicular phase, and higher ones after ovulation in the luteal phase). Be sure to use ovulation tests in conjunction with your basal charting to provide you with an accurate sense of your most fertile time of month.

1. Take your temperature first thing in the morning before you get out of bed or even speak — leave your thermometer at your bedside within easy reach so you don’t have to move much to get it. If you use a glass thermometer, make sure you shake it down before going to bed.

2. Try to take the temperature at as close to the same time each day as possible — set an alarm if you need to. Staying within a half hour either side of your average time is a good idea because your temp can vary with the time (i.e., if you usually take your temperature at 6 a.m., it is OK to take your BBT between 5:30-6:30, but the closer to 6 the better). The normal variation is by up to .2 degrees per hour — lower if you take your temperature early, higher if you take it late.

3. It is best to take your BBT after a minimum of 5 hours sleep, and at least 3 in a row is preferable.

4. You can take your temperature orally, vaginally, or rectally — just stay with the same method for the entire cycle.

5. You should try to place the thermometer the same way each day (same location of your mouth, same depth vaginally and rectally).

6. Plot your temperature on your chart each day, but refrain from reading too much into it until the cycle is done.

What you are looking for is a temperature shift of at least .4 degrees over a 48-hour period to indicate ovulation. This shift should be above the highest temperatures in the previous six days, allowing one temperature to be thrown out as inaccurate (fluke, illness).

# After you see a temperature shift for at least three days, or at the end of your cycle, you can draw a coverline between your follicular phase and luteal phase temperatures. With luck, it is easy to see a clear shift and draw your line between the highest follicular phase BBT and the lowest luteal phase BBT as in the sample above. The main reason for drawing this line is just to clearly delineate that your chart is biphasic.

# Look at the chart at the end of the month to analyze what happened.

# Chart for a few months and look for patterns.

# If your temperature stays up for 18 days or more after ovulation, you should test for pregnancy.

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